Audio visual training: Common problems and how to avoid them

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We’ve all undertaken training at some point in our career that uses audio-visual equipment; a presentation, a workshop, a video tutorial and plenty more. This type of training is widespread amongst the business world; in fact, almost anywhere that education is required.

Popularised for its ability to offer cheap, yet effective solutions to training demands, it utilises the two most effective learning styles: auditory and visual. Through this method, audio-visual equipment provides an engaging and adaptive education experience.

However, the audio-visual method is not without its flaws.

The benefits of training with audio-visual techniques are numerous, but only if you take proper advantage. It’s all too easy to fail at capitalising on all the benefits offered by the training platform. Here are the common issues faced, along with what you can do to stop them.

User Error

If you’ve undertaken some sort of education that uses audio-visual tech, you’ve probably also experienced a problem with it. For example, a link to a resource that won’t click out, a video that won’t play, a screen that won’t share, sound that is too quiet or that won’t work at all, software itself that won’t open; the list of technical errors goes on.

Often, though, this is not the fault of the software, but the operator. Failure to learn exactly how to use the software on which the training is found can result in some major problems. A video not working doesn’t sound all that bad, but if it holds important information that must be watched, the loss can make a big difference to the training. If the information is just too important to miss out on, the business could also incur costs due to extra employee downtime while the software is ‘figured out’. With training already an expensive process, increased costs are never a good thing.

Invest time in learning how to effectively operate the software and you’ll ensure that the training goes off without a hitch.

Poor-Quality Training Standards

A lack of engagement is a killer when it comes to training. If your trainees aren’t taking in the information, what is the point in running the process?

Audio-visual tech offers the educator an opportunity to provide something informative and well thought-out, but this training often only scrapes the bar in terms of taking advantage of audio visual training benefits.

Let me explain.

When you create a training session using audio-visual technology — a presentation, for example — you create slides that offer information and then you use spoken word to explain what is on the page. You also have the opportunity to use an array of visuals and audio to really explain and expand upon the training. However, presenters often stick to basic words on a page and an explanation over the top.

This fails to utilise the benefits that audio-visual technology can provide. Instead, it focuses on the auditory learning aspect of the platform. Auditory learning is often found to be inferior to visual learning, as memories are retained and engagement is higher when visuals are also utilised. Text on a page is not a memorable or engaging visual.

The simple answer is be more diverse with your audio-visual options. Use images, videos, sound bites, animations and other creative ways to engage the visual learning aspect of your training. Get people more involved by stimulating the visual learning experience.

A Total Lack of Hardware and Software

Audio-visual tech has come a long way since the days of a whiteboard and pen. Now, smart screens, WiFi and other modern inventions have really changed the game.

The use of technology can seriously improve your audio-visual options, increasing engagement and even offering interactivity.

However, if you don’t have any of the hardware or software that enables this type of modern training, instead opting for the old ways of training with an educator writing on a whiteboard, you are missing out on powerful tools that can transform the way your employees learn.

From James Berger of Netcom92